Sustainable Heritage Network

Tribal Cultural Tourism as a Tool for Community and Economic Development

In this presentation, Sandra Anderson, IT and Website Development Coordinator and Aimee Awonohopay, Public Lands Program Manager, both at the American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association (AIANTA) discuss ways in which communities can address the needs of tourists who are seeking an authentic Native experience as well as how can museums and cultural sites become such destinations. The presenters provide the resources needed to help start or enhance a tribal tourism program and share case studies of how tourism successfully enhanced preservation and engaged communities at Grand Canyon and along Route 66. This session was part of the ATALM annual conference held in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico, on October 10-13, 2017.

Tips for Successful In-House Exhibit Planning and Development

In this presentation, Tessa Campbell, Senior Curator at Hibulb Cultural Center & Natural History Preserve and Kaila Cogdill, Curator at Agua Caliente Cultural Museum, provide guidance for tribal communities and their respective cultural centers on the fundamentals of in-house exhibit planning and development. Using the 2016 Hibulb Cultural Center exhibit "Vibrant Beauty: Colors of Our Collection" as an example, the presenters discuss how to develop exhibitions' themes and goals, construct a storyline and timeline, develop budgets, and produce hands-on interactives with available resources. This session was part of the ATALM annual conference held in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico, on October 10-13, 2017.

Decolonizing Archives and Museums: What Comes Next?

In this presentation, Jennifer O'Neal, University Historian and Archivist at University of Oregon and Deana Dartt, Anne Ray Fellow at the School for Advanced Research, highlight some specific projects and Indigenous-led activist work happening to decolonize tribal and non-tribal archives and museums. The presenters review work completed in the ATALM Archive and Museum Summits on this topic, and suggest ways for moving forward to continue the work of decolonizing tribal archives and museums. This session was part of the ATALM annual conference held in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico, on October 10-13, 2017.

Project Management and Accountability: Budgeting, Reporting, and Measuring Performance

In this presentation, Sandra Toro, Senior Program Officer at IMLS; Madison Bolls, Grants Management Specialist at IMLS; Stephen Mayeaux, Library Program Specialist at IMLS; and Sandra Narva, Senior Program Officer at IMLS, introduce concepts and practices to help participants manage their federally-funded projects and meet federal requirements for accountability. Topics covered include: drafting budgets and budget changes; writing and submitting financial and narrative reports; and measuring success toward achievement of a project's goals and objectives. This session was part of the ATALM annual conference held in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico, on October 10-13, 2017.

Introduction to Mukurtu Content Management System (CMS): Providing Digital Access to Cultural Collections

This Sustainable Heritage Network-sponsored workshop focused on the use of Mukurtu CMS in tribal archives, libraries and museums. Mukurtu CMS, developed with funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, is a free content management system that allows communities to preserve, share, manage, license and curate their digital heritage and stories using their own cultural protocols, languages and social values. In this workshop, participants received hands-on training in setting up a Mukurtu site, implementing Mukurtu's core features including a dictionary and mobile application, and the step-by-step procedures to curate digital heritage items utilizing Mukurtu CMS. Participants were shown examples of Mukurtu in use in communities emphasizing preservation strategies, cultural protocols and the use of traditional knowledge labels.
Instructors: Kimberly Christen, Co-Director, Center for Digital Scholarship and Curation, WSU; Michael Wynne, Digital Applications Librarian, WSU; Alex Merrill, Head of Systems, WSU Libraries, WSU

2017 Pre-ATALM SHN Workshop Image Digitization on a Budget Slides

In this presentation, Jeanine Nault, Digital Asset Specialist of the American Folklife Center at Library of Congress and Lotus Norton-Wisla, Tribal Digital Archives Curriculum Coordinator at Washington State University Libraries cover digitization of images and documents on a budget, including basic digitization planning, project organization, technical specifications, digitization workflow, digital preservation strategies, open source software, and hands-on digitization skills. Instructors emphasize tribal needs and outcomes for digitization projects including focusing on tribal values, tribal community projects and use of digital materials. This presentation was given at the 2017 Pre-ATALM SHN Workshop Image Digitization on a Budget held in Santa Ana Pueblo, NM in October 2017.

HANDOUTS

Types of Metadata

File Naming Management for Photographs

Technical Specifications for Image Digitization

Image Digitization Resource List

Scanner Good, Better, Best

Image Scanning Instructions

Camera Based Image Workstation

Resolution Tonal Range

Metadata Activity and Discussion

Digital Preservation Storage Questions

 

 

2016 Pre-ATALM Mukurtu CMS Workshop

Led by Kim Christen, Mukurtu Project Director; Lotus Norton Wisla, Tribal Digital Archives Curriculum Coordinator, and Michael Wynne, Digital Applications Librarian, all based at Washington State University. Mukurtu CMS is a free content management software that allows communities to preserve, share, manage, license and curate their digital heritage and stories. Mukurtu promotes a community approach to digital heritage management and preservation, integrating already established social and cultural systems with technological tools. In this workshop, participants received hands-on experience with Mukurtu CMS. Participants learned about: basic site set up, core features , and step-by-step procedures to curate digital heritage items with Mukurtu CMS. Participants saw examples of Mukurtu in use in communities emphasizing preservation strategies, cultural protocols and the use of traditional knowledge labels.

Introducing the Traditional Knowledge (TK) Labels

These slides were used by Jane Anderson, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Museum Studies at New York University; co-director of Local Contexts; Guha Shankar, Folklife Specialist at the Library of Congress Folklife Center; and Donald Soctomah, Historical Preservation Officer of the Passamaquoddy Nation, at the 2016 Pre-ATALM Workshop: Developing Tools to Navigate Intellectual Property and Protect Cultural Heritage,  held in Phoenix on October 10, 2016. The session provided an introduction to the Tratidional Knowledge (TK) Labels and the Local Contexts online platform. During the session, Jane Anderson explained what do TK Labels do, examples in which the TK Labels are being used (both within communities and by external institutions), and showed examples of ways in which communities are adapting the TK Labels in order to address issues of access, control, and ownership of digitized and circulating Indigenous materials and traditional knowledge.

Copyright Issues: Identification and Strategy

These slides were used by Jane Anderson, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Museum Studies at New York University; co-director of Local Contexts; Guha Shankar, Folklife Specialist at the Library of Congress Folklife Center; and Donald Soctomah, Historical Preservation Officer of the Passamaquoddy Nation, at the 2016 Pre-ATALM Workshop: Developing Tools to Navigate Intellectual Property and Protect Cultural Heritage,  held in Phoenix on October 10, 2016. The session provided an overview of what is intellectual property law and copyright and the problems that the law poses for the protection of Native collections. During the session, the instructors discussed as well some of the issues around access, control, and ownership of digitized and circulating Indigenous materials and traditional knowledge.

2016 Post-ATALM SHN Workshop Part 4: Digital Preservation

Led by Alex Merrill, Head of Systems and Technical Operations, Washington State University (WSU) Libraries, and Lotus Norton-Wisla, Tribal Archives Digital Curriculum Coordinator, WSU Libraries. This presentation on digital preservation was given as part of the 2016 Post-ATALM Sustainable Heritage Network Workshop. The presentation introduces a model called the Digital Preservation Pyramid which breaks digital preservation into three components that it breaks down in greater detail. These componente are file storage, file integrity, and file access. Beyond the technical aspects of digital preservation, the presentation walks through the creation of an action plan that will help one obtain recognition and buy in from units and individuals needed to create a sustainable program. Some units and individuals mentioned are supervisors, IT staff, and funders. 

HANDOUTS:

Digital Preservation Pyramid

Digital Preservation Questions

Digital Preservation Action Plan